Wednesday, 27 April 2016

Alampuram Jogulamba





The temple of Jogulamba is situated in the town of Alampur in the Mahbubnagar district of Andhra Pradesh. It is one of the Ashtadasa Sakthi Peethams (18 holy abodes of Mother Goddess) which is one of the famous spiritual places in the state.

The word "Jogulamba" is derived from "Joginula Amma" (Mother of Joginis). Jogini (also called as Yogini) means a female person, who has given up all the earthly attachments. Jogini also has another meaning which implies a dancer (female) whose life is dedicated to God. Hence, the goddess is also known as Yogulamba or Yogamba.




Jogulamba is one of the eighteen Shakti peethas. Oordhva danta pankti (Upper jaw with tooth) of devi fell here. Jogulamba temple is located in the South-East corner of the village beside Tungabhadra River. Idol of Jogulamba is in sitting position has huge amount of hair with lizard, scorpion, bat and a human skull in it. Alampur is called as City of Temples and famous for their sculpture.





Alampur is the meeting point of the sacred rivers Tungabhadra and Krishna and is referred to as Dakshina Kashi(also known as Navabrahmeshwara Theertha) and the Western Gateway of Srisailam, the famous Shaivite (Shaivism) pilgrim centre. The principal deities at Alampur are Brahmeshwara and Jogulamba. It is surrounded by the Nallamalai hills. Alampur is situated on the left bank of the Tungabhadra river.

About Temple:-

The Jogulamba temple was reconstructed at the same place where it stood. The temple was rebuilt in the same way it was described in the `Rasaratnakaram' of Nityanatha Sidha of 12th century AD. Sankaracharya was believed to have installed `Sri Chakra' at Jogulamba temple, which is not available now.






Since the Alampur temple complex was declared a heritage site, the supporters of Jogulamba temple had a difficult time to convince the Archaeological Survey of India and the State Government to revive the temple. Fund mobilisation The temple was designed to match the Chalukyan architecture so that the new temple would fit into the group of temples. The Endowments Department, led by the former Commissioner, Ajay Kallam, took initiative to raise funds for reconstruction of the temple.






The temples across the country donated money for the temple while Srisailam Devastanam adopted it to ensure uninterrupted rituals. Giving the reasons for failure to revive the temple in the last 600 years, Sanskrit scholar, historian and epigraphist, Gadiyaram Ramakrishna Sarma, has analysed that political uncertainty prevailed during the medieval age delayed the reconstruction of the temple.



Alampur is in Mahbubnagar district, in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India. It is located at about 90 KM from Mahabubnagar, 27 km From Kurnool and 200 km from Hyderabad.

Siginificance of Jogulamba Temple:-
Jogulamba can be understood as "Gruha Chandi" (protector of our homes). As we noticed, the idol shows that the goddess has a lizard, scorpion, bat and human skull in her hair. These are the indications of evil and signs of deterioration of a house. Lizard is the primary indication that a house starting to lose its life.






Gradually, the number of lizards shall increase which result in the welcoming of scorpions which is even worse. The next level would be the entrance of bats which may result in death of humans living in that house. People believe that Jogulamba protects them and their shelters from all kinds of evils. She is also worshipped to be freed from Vastu Doshas (faults in constructions). The temple attracts a large number of pilgrims from various parts for the country and major festivals like Dussera, Maha Shivaratri are celebrated with pomp.




Alampur is the meeting point of the sacred rivers Tungabhadra and Krishna and is referred to as Dakshina Kashi(also known as Navabrahmeshwara Theertha) and the Western Gateway of Srisailam, the famous Shaivite (Shaivism) pilgrim centre. The principal deities at Alampur are Brahmeshwara and Jogulamba. It is surrounded by the Nallamalai hills. Alampur is situated on the left bank of the Tungabhadra river.